Luxury Goods

Today I splurged, indulged in a pricey whim, treated myself to something normally outside my budget.  What was it?  The newly released Samsung Galaxy S4?  A Chanel bag to better fit in with brand-conscious Tokyoites?  The Mikimoto pearl necklace I’ve been coveting for years?

None of the above.  I bought fruit.

Yes, fruit is a luxury good in Japan.  Living in the world’s most expensive city has desensitizing me to most price tags, but when grapes are $15/bunch and ten strawberries cost $6, I still steer clear of the supermarket’s fruit aisle.  In Tokyo, a bowl of fruit on the dining table is not a simple and edible centerpiece, but an ostentatious display of wealth.

1280 yen for grapes!!

Granted, Japanese fruit is perfect.  Perfectly shaped, perfectly colored and packaged to preserve this perfection.  Midsummer peaches are individually wrapped in plastic, cushioned in styrofoam, then sold a wooden and cardboard box.  Even in the orchard, little sunshades are placed on buds before they blossom to make sure the fruit won’t scorch during the upcoming growing season.

Persimmon sun hats

Japan excels at making even the strangest things trendy (and expensive), and fruit is no exception.  Gifting fruit has become a type of status symbol.  Fruit baskets can cost upwards of $100.  Products like a square watermelon or a designer cantaloupe are similarly priced.  When a certain regional product becomes famous, the normally inflated prices skyrocket to near extortion.  A pair of Yubari melons can cost thousands of dollars.

Worth it?

Luxury Fruit Gift Shop

5-piece fruit basket: $110

6-piece fruit basket: $130

Advertisements

One thought on “Luxury Goods

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s